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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 9,261 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 10, 2012 3:00am PST
was one that would then it can be as mature, strong or whatever, than a man. but we also see the attribute of imagery, of seduction, which was exactly what was into it in madonna. >> so we can all understand. when you saw madonna in her appointed course it, this was not the first time you had seen womens' underwear -- in her pointed corset, this was not the first emmy had seen women's underwear. you saw it with your grandmother and the work she did. isn't there a teddy bear in bastardi -- in the story? >> the teddy bear was there. [unintelligible] for a little boy, no, you cannot have a doll. you have to have a train. i was not traumatized by the train. maybe why do not drive. but also like a teddy bear. i cannot put it in a dress. i cut bras with newspaper or a magazine and would use pins to make that bra. to me, it was like the silhouettes as of may be on the tv. we saw a lot of movies. so i tried to reconstitute the body of a woman. and -- >> how old were you at this point? >> i think i was around -- i was around, i was a round -- the teddy bear, i got it at 3:00, but i let hi
SFGTV2
Dec 11, 2012 9:30pm PST
make up was the makeup of my grandmother. you can see an exhibition a teddy bear. i should say that he is a little nice monster, but it is a little monster anyway. you know, i have some affinity with air. i'd love the air. i love to touch the air. >> i hope you like my hair, because of a drag queen's last night were trying to touch it. [laughter] >> for the moment, i am not yet a drag queen. but you can look at that photograph of me. thank you for the inspiration. [laughter] >> well we are joking about the corsets, you say it had a message. it was not showing the women in their undergarments for sexual reasons. it was to show their strong women. certainly madonna personified that. >> definitely. >> was it actually madonna in in 1990, the blond ambition tour, but this was not the first time you had done these bras. there was a link with africa. did i get that right? >> i did not get the thing with africa. >> i thought that when we see -- >> yes, yes, 1985. the first corset dress, i did a collection. collections were big. it was a mix of difficulty. and the lingerie. one part was the
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 3:00am PST
spend when he was learning paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits -- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kin
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
company, joffrey ii into the main company. i was learning a role in "kettentanz" and i was working my darndest to be noticed. well, i got noticed. the first things mr. arpino said to me was, "hey, you with the spatulas at the end of your legs -- get outta my sight." i loved it because, you know all i could think of was he noticed me! narrator: inspired by the influx of new, young dancers, gerry arpino had another creative burst choreographing several new ballets which pleased the crowds -- but not always the critics. sklute: his work may not have been what the intelligentsia thought was great ballet. but they were great ballets! they excited audiences. they got our heartbeats going. anawalt: it's true that his works took a beating. dance critics needed to make sure that people understood gerald arpino is a b-rated choreographer and george balanchine is "a." woman: what gerry arpino did was he took the classical vocabulary and he then stretched it in a way which was very american and very modern, to be more exaggerated to be faster to be more dynamic. it was really trying to find a way
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 12:00pm PST
the broader civic realm. milton and i were in the former category. i was working for barbara boxer at the time and milton who you grew up in politics was involved with friends of the urban forest and a leader in many ways but had only recently moved back to san francisco after years on the east coast to help care for his ailing father and spend more time with family among other things, so participating in this program was a way for him to start the next chapter of his life back in san francisco to build new friendships, and to reconnect with the local community. i think it's fair to say that he was view as the older statesman of the group. not because of his age. there were many other similar people his age but because of his sage like quality. milton was a wise soul and every one recognized it and benefits from it. soon after the program ended both he and i joined the board of the democratic jewish club and milton became president the following year. just two years after having moved back to san francisco, but more than any shared any in politics the bond that we had, and that i saw
SFGTV2
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm PST
finishing up with a talk about the outside lambs, an area that was previously considered uninhabitable. uninhabitable due to fog. [inaudible] but we have with us a couple of real experts in outside plans. -- i am outside -- in outside lands. woody has devoted a lot of his time and effort to the outside lands. >> we are a nonprofit in our 10th year, and we are dedicated to preserving and sharing the history of san francisco. >> it is great to have you here. and pat, who has a lot of knowledge and brought to be sure today a lot of [inaudible] , and she can share with that -- she can share that with us as well, and we only regret that harvey the wonder dog could not be here. we talked about [inaudible] what area, generally, are we talking about? >> the term came from what was called the pueblo land when the san francisco peninsula was switched over from mexican ownership to american ownership. certain tracts were preserved, so there was a more orderly, even though it took decades, transfer of ownership of those lands, but there were also what were called pueblo lands, which were sort of a
SFGTV2
Dec 17, 2012 1:00pm PST
program was civic involvement and support and i think milton would appreciate that if we knock on supervisor's doors and do some advocacy since we're all here anyway. although milton didn't relish the work he had to do in these halls he knew it was necessary for the canopy outside to grow and thrive and let's remember where his legacy really lies and it gives me solace to know that his sons will see him imprint in san francisco every time they walk down the street. let's all look up and remember him this way. thank you. [applause] >> we get to meet milton's niece zoey marks. >> i was think about the past 19 years with my uncle milton in preparation for writing this piece but i was really stumped. how could i encapsulate such a generous relationship i had with my uncle in five minutes? as a last resort i went to facebook and the refuge for all bored teenagers especially late at night. turns out there was a wealth of communication between my uncle. and my topic and i was going to write about the wonderful similarities between milton and me and the first similarity is obvious. both o
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 8:30pm EST
] >> after the boston massacre there was a brief discussion should be sent a ship's captain? a bostonian said i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
getting at? >> one of the things i like best about 1775, which was a much more spurned group of people, granted the founding fathers -- more inspiring group of people, granted, the founding fathers were not always -- seven out of the 10 counties, metropolitan washington, it is the country did is still great but a capital that is not. would have predicted that? >> if anyone would have guessed that there would be a country of 300 million people, they may wouldn't come up with a bit of cynicism. but they were dedicated people. >> you say, during the last four years, during the campaign of 2012, you stuck your nose at this. >> the first time i did something like that was back in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english speaking civil wars, the american revolution. i did it thinking about bill clinton and newt gingrich. it was nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of between 2002 and 2008, and said it is time to go back in history again. hop in my time capsule and forget about these fellows. and i
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm PST
his own man. most of you know and it was talked about he was literally the namesake of two two legendary political leaders and his mother was no slouch herself. milton could have went into a predictable role here in san francisco but instead he proved himself and school and the nonprofit thousands of miles away where his name had no currency. now milton and i disagreed about practically everything in politics but when he ran for the community college board i was proud of one of the non californians that contributed to his campaign and would have voted for him and probably the only contractor from my political party but i knew this because i knew milton wasn't going into service for himself but he realized he could make a difference to the community. and for all of milton's achievement and qualities family was always the most important thing. when susan's and my daughters came along he would crawl on the floor with them for hours and talked about how much he wanted to be a husband and father one day and that's why we were set r so happy when he met abbey and truly understood mil
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:00pm EST
, you stuck your nose at this. >> the first time i did something like that was back in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english speaking civil wars, the american revolution. i did it thinking about bill clinton and newt gingrich. it was nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of between 2002 and 2008, i said it is time to go back in history again. hop in my time capsule and forget about these fellows. and i have forgotten about them pretty well. i cannot remember, for example, the name of the governor of texas who was such a jerk in the primary. [laughter] the fact that he could not remember the departments in the government, i guess it is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i liked, that i thought was worth pursuing. and a long time ago, i did a book called "the emerging republican majority." i thought i would take the methodologies that i would use in that book and try to come up with a good explanation of the realignment of 177
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 11:00pm PST
he ran for the community college board i was proud of one of the non californians that contributed to his campaign and would have voted for him and probably the only contractor from my political party but i knew this because i knew milton wasn't going into service for himself but he realized he could make a difference to the community. and for all of milton's achievement and qualities family was always the most important thing. when susan's and my daughters came along he would crawl on the floor with them for hours and talked about how much he wanted to be a husband and father one day and that's why we were set r so happy when he met abbey and truly understood milton and became his rock. i will never forget the wedding in napa and abbey on the stage and raid yent in the dress and serenaded milton with "our love is here to stay". after the boys arrived i remember visiting their house and crawling around with them on their floor. i never seen milton so happy. i will always remember milton's wicked laugh and sense of humor and his bed rock decency and what made him unique though was h
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better or worse i was out there and i couldn't change it. somewhere in here i knew anyway that i was don
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 3:30am PST
to make them as a john wayne, you know? apparently. it was very sensitive in reality. you have to be sensitive anyway. but to look real mature like that. so i wanted to show the first collection i did. for me, it was evident. the male object. i always felt, not consulted because i do not consider myself as a woman, but i felt insulted for the woman to say, you know, there was that expression for the woman. [speaking foreign language] she had a lot to say, a very modern woman. i say, is that completely stupid? maybe she is beautiful. so i say that the men i show will be balanced. i do not say that is the only object, not at all. unless maybe. but i want to show that community and men. and i wanted to show the masculinity in the woman. >> humans and in passing just now farida kelfer, the was the beginning of the showing on the runway, models who were not typical of the models at the time. i am sorry to say that is this still true that we see so little diversity on the runways. it is really shameful. you have always thought their direct there are -- showing that there is a recurrence of
NBC
Dec 27, 2012 10:00pm EST
, saw it was your car. figured it was stolen. - hey, ron, why don't you get me out of these handcuffs, so i can put you into these handcuffs. - yes, and officer, why don't you take off those handcuffs? i want this to be a fair fight. - officer, did you see any sign of a passenger? [thumping from trunk] - ron! - there we go. - hey! [thumping] help. >> we have been preparing for months. we have seen mockups of the compound. we have looked at helicopter flight p patteatterns. >> the president said it's a go. >> in that situation you just do some praying. >> what were you watching? >> we were able to monitor in real time what was taking place. >> the mood was tense. >> we could see the helicopters and our guys moving. >> when we saw the helicopters spinning, we said that was not the plan. >> we were all holding our breath. >> everyone went whoa. >> we thought about if there was a failure here, it would have disastrous consequences. >> when we got the message that they had killed bin laden, it wasn't over. >> the only thing that i was thinking about was i really want to get those guys back
SFGTV2
Dec 17, 2012 3:30am PST
>> i was 11 or 12 in a school that was mixed. there were boys and girls. there was one girl i remember that was coming from the french colony. she was in algeria and came back to france. she had a very white skin. very, very white with speckles? >> freckles. >> freckles. more glamorous. glittering. but she was glamorous for me, sparkles -- no, freckles. sorry, i cannot say. [laughter] but she has beautiful red hair, light afro type but red hair. to me, i was like, oh, my god, she is so beautiful. for me, if i want to be friends with someone that i admire, i have to be like him or her, cannot have the red hair. so i say, i also come from nigeria and i am like you. [laughter] i do not think she believed me so i was inventing names. anyway. so she influenced me. she had white skin. you could see her veins. she was very strange but beautiful for me. i was always attracted by different beauty that i saw everywhere. i remember some movies called guess who's coming to have dinner tonight with sydney party. i remember i said to my parents -- i was 12. if i come with a black girl, what
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 9:30pm PST
now farida kelfer, the was the beginning of the showing on the runway, models who were not typical of the models at the time. i am sorry to say that is this still true that we see so little diversity on the runways. it is really shameful. you have always thought their direct there are -- showing that there is a recurrence of the beauty from debra countries and origins. >> i was 11 or 12 in a school that was mixed. there were boys and girls. there was one girl i remember that was coming from the french colony. she was in algeria and came back to france. she had a very white skin. very, very white with speckles? >> freckles. >> freckles. more glamorous. glittering. but she was glamorous for me, sparkles -- no, freckles. sorry, i cannot say. [laughter] but she has beautiful red hair, light afro type but red hair. to me, i was like, oh, my god, she is so beautiful. for me, if i want to be friends with someone that i admire, i have to be like him or her, cannot have the red hair. so i say, i also come from nigeria and i am like you. [laughter] i do not think she believed me so i was inv
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm EST
while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know they don't know at all. the difficulty is that it is not always easy to establish to construct the path that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate to take apart our common sense to interrogate what we think we know to demystify, demythologize, move beyond the cliche about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of the forefathers especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is totally different story, the grounded benevolence, the life of joseph p. kennedy was an antique from house which if i looked at it long enough to reflect back to me often in pc and in distinct distorted form images of the events of people and places whi
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:30am EST
>> by the time i was nine i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i would say when i was 10 i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsey who was running for mayor of new york. but i wouldn't work with him at the republican headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york and some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and she asked why i made the case for lindsey and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case for his opponent as well. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, whit box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all of these doughnuts and a lot of 10 dollar bills. so in one of my early lessons in politics the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnut. >> tuesday night at 8:00 david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire's first all-women delegation. at 10:45, growing up in the white house with two women. that is tuesday e
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
. >> she later wrote in her memoir she said i myself never made any decision. i only decided what was important and when to present it to me has been. maggie stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle, to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> the way we look at these bugaboos made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i can't totally reminded about all the people who have lived there before and particularly all of the women. >> first lady and fluid and image, a new series on c-span, produced in collaboration with the white house historical association starting presidents' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchan
FOX News
Dec 29, 2012 11:00pm PST
presidential election. that was how it ended. barack obama beating mitt romney and an end to a bitter season that started early with the g.o.p. primaries and events like this. >> we saw some of this black church in south carolina where a woman asked you why you referred a president obama as the food stamp president. it sounds as if you are suitcase to go belittle people. >> first of all, juan, the fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by barack obama than any president in american history. [ cheers and applause ] >> i know among the political kli correct and i'm supposed to you use facts that are uncomfortable. [ laughter ] >> so that was just part of a long and memorable primary season. juan, is that your highlight of the year. [ laughter ] >> my highlight? it is telling again for newt gingrich. he in a subsequent debate when we was asked about extramarital life and enough about these questions and made the media successfully a target of his ire. >> jon: on the republican side, jim, it is often the case that the media go after republican candidates? >> right and that is why
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
including ddt and are, silent spring published in 1962. following publication coming ddt was banned in protection agency was created. this year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of "silent spring." this is a little over an hour. hardback >> thank you your thank you offer coming out tonight this wonderful facility. i love coming here. it's the coolest place and i wa reminded these guys are so fortunate to work at the national conservation training center. it's a really terrific facility. nice to be back here. nice to see all of you. i guess and the warm-up act for the presidential did a tonight. i promise no spin on a promise to finish intensivists if you can't get enough of politics will deal to go see it, although i don't know who that would be at this point. i'm sure we don't want to see the debate comes so we will finish on time for that. i'm here to talk about rachel carson and bismarck indicated that some of the 27th of december the 50th anniversary of silent spring. she was a famous author before she wrote "silent spring." i'm going to talk more about that tonight
NBC
Dec 28, 2012 9:00pm EST
case about to go way off script. >> her story did not make sense. >> what was really going on? >> i'm a cop of 11 years. i blushed when i listened to the tape. >> a story with more twists and turns than the florida roads they raced along trying to find this missing mom. >> this case was not going turn out like a lot of people assumed. >> josh mankiewicz with "ransom." ♪ ♪ ♪ >> thanks for joining us. i'm lester holt. whenever someone is kidnapped it triggers a race against time as police often joined by the victim's family, begin a frantic search. that's what happened in this story which begins with a young mom abducted at gunpoint, but as you're about to see, though her family and veteran investigators spent desperate days trying to find out where she was, they never could have guessed who had her and why. here's josh mankiewicz. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> this is the sheriff's office. >> my wife made a phone call to me a minute ago to say that she was held by gunpoint. >> businessman reid gray was on the line with the sheriff's office in a panic. he told the 911 operator that h
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
include "american phoenix" is about. and one of the things that helped me get there was someone asked me, so, if your book were made into a movie, how would you pitch it? and i answers the titanic meets rocky. [laughter] "american phoenix" is about, in essence, disaster and survival. it's about disaster of epic proportions that involved a lot of water and engineering failure, the failure of design that killed a lot of people. and it's about survival, the triumph of the human spirit, the will to overcome extreme adversity, the ability to get back up when you've been knocked down again and again. so my book explores the challenge of having to rebuild your life after losing everything in an unexpected catastrophe. and it explores the discovery that sometimes our worst nightmares can turn into our greatest opportunities. it's particularly poignant for me to be here in vermont talking about "american phoenix" a year after the devastation caused by irene. because so many vermonters can relate to what william skinner went through 130-odd years ago having to rebuild their lives, their lives that
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
company". the group was composed of 68 men in a military campaign during world war ii including landing on the beaches of normandy and the ascent of point do hawk. it starts right now on booktv. [applause] >> thank you for having me here today. it is great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things of come full circle in many ways. is a trite saying that today is the bat -- anniversary of the battle of volusia where i got started as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went through an aid station in -- and al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor and cots, a situation that was interesting. i will never forget looks on the side of the wall, the light had changed. there was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had this sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed along with a member of the iraqi forces that were accompanying us. it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head, the battalion commander was right next to me. five minute before that, said who are you? i am a comb
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:00am EST
was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center f
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 9:30pm EST
was here today. both warren and i voted for a bill. i received a great deal of hate mail because of my name. i'm half irish and half jewish. i am the only one who can be put on the israeli border and be shot from both sides. [laughter] i was getting all of the hate mail and warren was not getting any of them. i will broadcast nationwide that you are jewish and i am not. that way you will get all of the hate mail. he said, do not do that. you are much more politically secure than i am. besides, you would make a nice jewish boy. [laughter] let me conclude with what my favorite statements -- with one of my favorite statements. it sums up my feelings about warren. "through our great fortune, in our youth our hearts were touched with fire. it is given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing." do not pretend to undervalue the rewards of ambition. we have seen with our own eyes beyond the goal fields the honor. above all, we have learned that whether a man -- will look downward and dig, the one and only success is to bring to his work a mighty heart." warr
NBC
Dec 30, 2012 10:00am EST
what was the key to mitt romney's failure? we'll look at the nominations for best and worst political moves. unforced errors and of course our annual foot in mouth prize. and finally, the nerve of it. our annual chutzpah prize and who showed the most nerve and who are the heroes of 2012 in i'm chris matthews. welcome to a very special awards show. with us mike duffy from "time" magazine. bbc's katty kay. "new york times'" helene cooper and abc's sam donaldson. first up, 'tis the season for year-end political awards. best and worst. last year part one of our political awards and this week part two and this is pure fun. our first category president obama's smartest political decision of 2012. which one of these four choices will our roundtablers pick? was the smartest obama decision to campaign relentlessly on raising taxes on the rich? or was it the early takedown of mitt romney in all those ads last spring that painted him as a rich guy? or the high-tech multimillion dollar back room operation to identify every obama vote and then turn it out on election day? for finally, wa
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 7:15am EST
. army's second ranger battalion's e. company, also known as dog company. the group was composed of 68 men whose military campaigns during world war ii, included landing on the beaches of normandy and the sense of pointe du hoc. it is about 40 minutes and starts now on booktv. >> thank you so much for having me here today. it's great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things have come full circle in many ways. but today is the anniversary of the battle of falluja where i was embedded as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went to an aid station that was an al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor. it was quite a situation that was interesting but i'll never forget to i like look on the side of the walls. the light had changed. it was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had a sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed, along with a member of the iraq forces that were accompanying us. and it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head. the battalion commander was right next to me,
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all of this fighting of the war that was being successfully waged in another country. so i think this is a very interesting moment in american history. and it takes place that people don't really know much about this timeframe. the u.s. and mexico war -- people don't write about it a lot. it doesn't have a big place in the historical ima
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of kennedys, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and trying to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them, what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 2:00pm EST
soul. to young admirer, friend and colleague. i was struck, most of all by the deep emotional intensity and raw humanity that flows, of so many of these pages. amen is trying to account to himself and two world how he made his choices, where he fell and where he blundered, but also there is no going back, doing the right thing can still mean anything, not just for his own soul but his family, couny and generation. bill buckley as some of you know was a dramatic emotional man, very much so. it is not surprising to me chambers's odyssey moves bill profoundly. as my students know, bill buckley had many influences but the common in his life that was chambers certainly ranks as the most unexpected. the one to follow last year, at yale,. to help us get started today, who know much about the suspect. we had worked sitting in the middle, is distinguished fellow and conservative thought, the be simon center for principals and politics. dr. edwards has enjoyed a career as one of the leading historian of american conservatism. his works range from biographies of president reagan to a rec
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
>> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ike proposed what he called his opened scottish plan. the big fear in those early days of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. so ike proposed that each country on the other countries to fly over head to take any preparation of an attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed like the idea, but at a reception afterwards a short round man came straight towards president eisenhower, saying no, no, no. it was nikita khrushchev, the general secretary of the communist party. open skies is just a chance the americans to peer into the russian bedrooms. british foreign secretary harold mcmillan wrote was jeff is a mischief. how can this that man with his big eyes and lips flow of tal
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
. stoddard was one of the authors appearing at the fall for the book festival, held annually at the university. this is just under half an hour. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. and we are on location at george mason university. every fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the briti
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30pm EST
martin of politico. guest: we had known that there >> we have known for some time there was always tension between the campaign staff and the candidate's family in terms of how to fill mitt romney's -- how to tell the romney story. so many americans saw this rich business man and they never got a sense for who he was as a person. one of the most fascinating is that we came across was, romney had a mormon documentarian follow him around in the campaign. he was a friend of one of the romney sons. he had great access. he made a documentary about romney. in 2010, he showed it to the family, they loved it. the staff said, we are not going to show this to the public. they thought it showed too much of him talking about his mormon faith in a way that they feared could turn off the public, which has some misconceptions about that faith. to me, that captured the attention in the romney campaign. the staff never wanted to talk about the candidate. they wanted to make it about obama and his handling of the economy. ultimately, that a lot obama and his campaign to define mitt romney and his ca
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 5:15pm EST
years now, it was increasing intensity, is the flaws. i mean, you've got several generations of kids who have been educated to believe that the country stinks. it was born in sin and continued to be pursue evil object is, et. cetera. that's why i keep harping on this issue. i still think it is the major issue facing us, and conservatives, at least of not all strifes, i have to sigh, are the only force in the country that can be relied upon to -- well, at los, i think stop it. this particular history, i think, we can yell stop and it can succeed. we can draw on the deepest resources of the country's tradition to fight it. and but if we don't, nobody else will. and the battle will be lost. >> receipt me bring it back to whittaker claimers. the fact it looks like losing battle doesn't mean you don't do it. when chambers confronted communism. he was confronting the entire american establishment. everything was against him. i'm sure it looked like -- it looked very clearly that it was something he couldn't imagine he was going diseed. but he did it anyway. he the courage to do what he did
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 9:00am PST
. one, that jesus was born in bethlehem. to a virgin named mary. whose husband, joseph, was of the lineage of david. and this according to the writers of those two gospels was in fulfillment of the hebrew prophesies. so despite very clear and seemingly troubling contradictions in some of the details the more important thing is, i think, the points on which they disagree. >> on the physical -- on the physical details was it an inn or was it a two-story house? >> an inn or a two-story house. that's an interesting question. there certainly is a theory now that it was a two-story house. that the word that is oftentimes translated "inn" is a word that really should be translated "house" and that the couple were not turned away by a mean, old innkeeper but rather were let into the guest room of a typical two-story palestinian house. >> or was it the guest room was filled and they were told that they could rest with and sleep with the animals who were, where downstairs? >> the first story, the first floor is typically a place where the animals were kept. consequently, there would be a man
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